FreeTextSearch
 
search Change language (Se den danske version af denne side)
 
 
 

Cardiovascular health effects following exposure of human volunteers during fire extinction exercises

Andersen MHG, Saber AT, Pedersen PB, et al. Cardiovascular health effects following exposure of human volunteers during fire extinction exercises. Environmental Health 2017;16:96
Date: 2017
Scientific Article
[Open access]BACKGROUND: Firefighters have increased risk of cardiovascular disease and of sudden death from coronary heart disease on duty while suppressing fires. This study investigated the effect of firefighting activities, using appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), on biomarkers of cardiovascular effects in young conscripts training to become firefighters. METHODS: Healthy conscripts (n = 43) who participated in a rescue educational course for firefighting were enrolled in the study. The exposure period consisted of a three-day training course where the conscripts participated in various firefighting exercises in a constructed firehouse and flashover container. The subjects were instructed to extinguish fires of either wood or wood with electrical cords and mattresses. The exposure to particulate matter (PM) was assessed at various locations and personal exposure was assessed by portable PM samplers and urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene. Cardiovascular measurements included microvascular function and heart rate variability (HRV). RESULTS: The subjects were primarily exposed to PM in bystander positions, whereas self-contained breathing apparatus effectively abolished pulmonary exposure. Firefighting training was associated with elevated urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene (105%, 95% CI: 52; 157%), increased body temperature, decreased microvascular function (-18%, 95% CI: -26; -9%) and altered HRV. There was no difference in cardiovascular measurements for the two types of fires. CONCLUSION: Observations from this fire extinction training show that PM exposure mainly occurs in situations where firefighters removed the self-contained breathing apparatus. Altered cardiovascular disease endpoints after the firefighting exercise period were most likely due to complex effects from PM exposure, physical exhaustion and increased core body temperature
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-017-0303-8
Orders:
11.09.2017
 
Updated  11.09.2017
Contact: NRCWE web editors
 
Social media buzz on this scientific article

Click the badge for more information on mentions and sharings

The Altmetric service registers social media mentions and sharings of references to scholarly papers, provided the references point to the paper in a recognizable form (publisher's abstract page, DOI-links etc.). The service displays results from selected social media platforms.

If a "?" is displayed within the badge, no mentions or shares have been registered so far.

 
 
 

National Research Centre for the Working Environment | Lersø Parkallé 105 | DK-2100 Copenhagen O | Denmark |

Phone +45 3916 5200 | fax +45 3916 5201 | e-mail: nfa@arbejdsmiljoforskning.dk | CVR: 15413700 | EAN: 5798000399518

Vis desktop version
|WEBSITET ANVENDER COOKIES TIL AT HUSKE DIG OG DINE INDSTILLINGER.| Læs mere her