FreeTextSearch
 
search Change language (Se den danske version af denne side)
 
 
 

Pig farmers' homes harbor more diverse airborne bacterial communities than pig stables or suburban homes

Vestergaard DV, Holst GJ, Basinas I, et al. Pig farmers' homes harbor more diverse airborne bacterial communities than pig stables or suburban homes. Frontiers in Microbiology 2018;9:870
Date: 2018
Scientific Article
[Open access]Airborne bacterial communities are subject to conditions ill-suited to microbial activity and growth. In spite of this, air is an important transfer medium for bacteria, with the bacteria in indoor air having potentially major consequences for the health of a building's occupants. A major example is the decreased diversity and altered composition of indoor airborne microbial communities as a proposed explanation for the increasing prevalence of asthma and allergies worldwide. Previous research has shown that living on a farm confers protection against development of asthma and allergies, with airborne bacteria suggested as playing a role in this protective effect. However, the composition of this beneficial microbial community has still not been identified. We sampled settled airborne dust using a passive dust sampler from Danish pig stables, associated farmers' homes, and from suburban homes (267 samples in total) and carried out quantitative PCR measurements of bacterial abundance and MiSeq sequencing of the V3-V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes found in these samples. Airborne bacteria had a greater diversity and were significantly more abundant in pig stables and farmers' homes than suburban homes (Wilcoxon rank sum test P < 0.05). Moreover, bacterial taxa previously suggested to contribute to a protective effect had significantly higher relative and absolute abundance in pig stables and farmers' homes than in suburban homes (ALDEx2 with P < 0.05), including Firmicutes, Peptostreptococcaceae, Prevotellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, Ruminiclostridium, and Lactobacillus. Pig stables had significantly lower airborne bacterial diversity than farmers' homes, and there was no discernable direct transfer of airborne bacteria from stable to home. This study identifies differences in indoor airborne bacterial communities that may be an important component of this putative protective effect, while showing that pig stables themselves do not appear
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.00870
Orders:
28.05.2018
 
Updated  28.05.2018
Contact: NRCWE web editors
 
Social media buzz on this scientific article

Click the badge for more information on mentions and sharings

The Altmetric service registers social media mentions and sharings of references to scholarly papers, provided the references point to the paper in a recognizable form (publisher's abstract page, DOI-links etc.). The service displays results from selected social media platforms.

If a "?" is displayed within the badge, no mentions or shares have been registered so far.

 
 
 

National Research Centre for the Working Environment | Lersø Parkallé 105 | DK-2100 Copenhagen O | Denmark |

Phone +45 3916 5200 | fax +45 3916 5201 | e-mail: nfa@nfa.dk | CVR: 15413700 | EAN: 5798000399518

Vis desktop version
|WEBSITET ANVENDER COOKIES TIL AT HUSKE DIG OG DINE INDSTILLINGER.| Læs mere her